Your Action Plan

  • Technology & STEMM

    • Increase equity and access in STEMM education, especially for communities that are disproportionately affected by climate change. Here’s an example of a STEMM afterschool program.
    • For teachers: bring space, our universe, and our planet into your classroom.
    • Learn more about IoT devices and innovative initiatives to combat climate change (Interact, IoT for all).
    • Read this Vox article to learn about the International Energy Agency’s technological innovations to achieve net-zero carbon emissions and recommendations for how to move forward.
    • Study the areas of STEMM and technology that speak most to your interests and experiences to better support research and development in those sectors.
    • Request help from a woman in STEMM through 500 Women Scientists: a resource for journalists, educators, policy makers, scientists, and anyone needing scientific expertise.
    • Advocate for the regulation of social media misinformation on climate change. You can increase your media literacy and take action here.
    • Apply to grants that support research to understand and combat climate change. Check out the US Environmental Protection Agency’s grants and ClimateWork’s grants database.
    • Learn more about climate indicators from this interactive ArcGIS StoryMap created by the World Meteorological Organization.
  • Sesame Cauliflower Rice

    Sesame Cauliflower Rice

    From Anja Grommons

    Looking for a vegetable that is a great source of fiber and will keep you full?
    Try this vegan-friendly side dish that is a warm, comforting, umami-rich snack!
    Bowl of sesame cauliflower rice

    Prep Time: 3-5 Minutes | Total Time: 15 Minutes
    Servings: 4

    INGREDIENTS ⁠⠀

    • 1 package frozen cauliflower (4 servings) ⠀
    • 1 tbsp sesame oil
    • 1 tbsp soy sauce
    • 1 tsp garlic powder and onion powder
    • 1/2 tsp turmeric powder and cumin
    • Toppings: sesame seeds, green onions, and chili sauce

    INSTRUCTIONS

    1. Empty the bag of frozen cauliflower into a bare pan on medium heat. Stir occasionally. The ice crystals will melt and help create a barrier to prevent the rice from burning. If ice crystals are not noted, you may consider adding 1-2 Tablespoons of liquid or broth.
    2.  As the cauliflower begins to thaw, stir in seasonings and soy sauce.

    3. Turn heat up to medium-high and stir frequently. This will allow the rice to get crispy, but you must stir frequently.

    4. As the cauliflower texture begins to appear crisp, drizzle sesame oil over the rice rice, stir, and heat for another minute or so. Note: adding sesame oil toward the end of the cooking process retains much of the toasted sesame flavor without an excessive amount.

    Download Recipe
  • Chickpea Salad

    Chickpea Salad

    From Anja Grommons

    Looking for an easy and versatile protein-packed salad?
    Try this vegan chickpea salad on a bed of greens, or sandwiched between lightly toasted bread!
    Chickpea salad on toasted bread

    Total Time: 10 Minutes
    Servings: 4-5

    INGREDIENTS ⁠⠀

    • 1 can chickpeas, rinsed
    • 3 tbsp  vegan mayo or blended silken tofu
    • 1 medium stalk celery, roughly chopped
    • 2 tsp each: dried dill, onion powder, and garlic powder
    • 2 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
    • 1 tbsp lemon juice
    • Salt and pepper to taste
    • 1 tbsp nori or dulse flakes (optional)

    INSTRUCTIONS

      1. Add all ingredients to a food processor and pulse until well combined, scraping the sides occasionally. Do not over-process. The goal is not hummus-like consistency, but a more chunky texture.

    Tip: If you don’t have a food processor, you can mash it up by hand. It will take longer if using a potato masher (or even a fork), but it will still turn out lovely. If you take this route, chop celery into extra small pieces and add to the mashed mixture toward the end.

  • Renewable Energies

  • Finance & Divestments

    • Explore the whole Banking on Climate Chaos report to get a full picture of how the runaway funding for fossil fuel extraction and infrastructure fuels climate chaos and threatens the lives and livelihoods of millions.
    • Call your bank and demand divestment from fossil fuels with the help of Stop the Money Pipeline.
    • Disinvest from carbon-heavy industries and investments by using this guide. Making sure your financial portfolio matches your beliefs is a sound investment in our collective future. Many mutual funds and retirement accounts offer clean energy and carbon-free options, and various groups have helped demonstrate the risk of carbon-heavy investments in light of a worldwide shift toward cleaner energy.
    • Support the Adaptation Fund which uses grants to finance localized projects and programmes that help vulnerable communities in developing countries adapt and build resilience to climate change.
    • Build public pressure to create “green” banks and encourage banks to subsidize adaptation projects
      for sustainable housing development.
  • Quorn Fillet With Grilled Vegetables

    Quorn Fillet With Grilled Vegetables

    From @tigesthabte

    INGREDIENTS ⁠⠀

    • 400 g cherry tomatoes
    • 4 red peppers
    • 2 yellow onions
    • 5 garlic cloves
    • 4 tbsp rapeseed oil
    • 200 g spinach
    • 350 g Quorn fillet ⠀
    • 400 g mushrooms
    • 1 tbsp thyme⠀
    • 2 tsp black pepper & salt⠀
    • 4 tbsp sweet chili
    • 2 tbsp olive oil
    • lemon juice

    INSTRUCTIONS

    1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees.
    2. Cut the red peppers and yellow onions into 5 parts. Cut the mushrooms into 2 parts. Add the cherry tomatoes.
    3. Season with thyme and black pepper.
    4. Add rapeseed oil and mix it. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes at 180 degrees.
    5. Heat a saucepan with garlic cloves and olive oil. Divide the Quorn fillet into small pieces and fry it in the saucepan. Add salt.
    6. Heat for 20 minutes at a low temperature.
    7. Then add all baked ingredients into the saucepan with sweet chili, some lemon juice, and spinach. Mix together.
  • Youth Organizing

    Youth Organizing

    Why it is important

    Youth Leadership & Superpowers:
    1. Young people can change the world: “Throughout history and today, many social movements have been led and mobilized by young people. They’ve continued to lead the way in social change, and we see this demonstrated by groups who have brought upon the highest voter turnout in the 2020 election, or by the students of Stoneman Douglas who turned a tragedy into a national demand for change.”(“Remember these faces, Remember Us”)
    2. Young people encompass a wide range of skills: Whether it’s multi-tasking, being outspoken for your cause, or knowing how to throw together a PSA, young people have an unstoppable perspective of what they can do and know how to apply their skills to accomplish their goals. In advocating for a cause, they’re further developing these skills, which will allow them to be great leaders and civically active adults.
    3. Young people are collaborative: Youth organizers are supportive of each others’ needs and recognize where others’ can help with their efforts. They utilize superpowers to their advantage, choosing to step up where they see fit and collaborating with others when they lack knowledge or expertise.
    In the words of activist Jamie Margolin, Power Youth Activists hold:
    1. Fresh energy and perspectives: “Youth brings new ideas to the table, as well as a fresh energy and drive that many of our elders have lost. No one knows better than we do what it is like to grow up in the current time.”
    2. Expertise on the issues that personally affect us: “Many adults in power do not comprehend or even hear much about important film issues from young people’s perspectives. They do not feel climate change like we do; they don’t feel student loans or an economy that makes it increasingly difficult for us to find good-paying jobs like we do. When we speak about what we are going through, that rings true to people, and it looks bad for someone in power to discredit their lived experiences of a young person”

    “Beyond knowing what power you do and don’t have as a young person in this world, it is also important to know what you will be up to no matter what. Keep in mind that the more marginalized identities you carry, the more you will be up against. Know how the world perceives you (whether their perception is true or not) so you can best arm yourself to overcome their preconceived notions.” – Jamie Margolin (Youth to Power)

    Download.pdf
  • Food, Agriculture & Regeneration

  • Intergenerational Conversations

    Intergenerational Conversations

    Intergenerational conversations are an important aspect of both understanding climate change and helping inform others about how their practices may affect our planet. They allow the sharing of ideas and information across groups with differing generational perspectives, educational backgrounds, and personal experiences. And as youth-led climate movements are rising, they stand on the shoulders of many generations who have led the way.

    Why intergenerational climate conversations are important:
    1. Younger generations have a powerful voice in demanding justice but may need help with the monetary, legislative and institutional power to elicit change in systems that have existed for many years. Therefore, conversations with older generations can inform the success of youth-driven climate movements on a local and global level.
    2. Alternatively, older generations may often feel comfortable in their ways, thus resistant to large systemic change. It’s crucial for younger generations within the family setting to encourage their parents and grandparents to act in greater urgency on climate issues that will evidently affect themselves and future generations.
    3. Younger generations have a track-record of having high moral ground on a wide-array of social-justice issues, so many feel there’s a responsibility to remind others of the intersectional aspect of climate change and how it disproportionately affects communities.
    4. Older generations tend to have more experience in understanding and managing complex institutional systems. Young people need their guidance and leadership to inform their movements on how to most effectively enact positive social change.
    5. Older generations run the large news outlets and determine widespread media coverage, of which the young require to amplify their movements or causes. In contrast, the younger generations have found ways to create movements via other media platforms like social media, which could be a valuable tool for adults to utilize in their own organizing efforts.
    6. Intergenerational conversations elicit cross cultural and cross educational solidarity, and therefore strengthen communities.
    An older caucasian woman holds up a protest sign that says "elders and grandparents supporting students"
    Here are some ideas on how to have these hard conversations with those you love, who may have different generational perspectives or educational backgrounds:
    1. Know everything there is to know on your topic: Many people are going to automatically assume that you as a young person don’t know what you are talking about –which means you have to become an expert. Be overprepared (Jamie Margolin, Youth to Power). At the same time, acknowledge when you have more to understand and make that a collaborative learning experience.
    2. Defy stereotypes and expectations of your immaturity and irresponsibility: People may expect you to be impatient, immature, reckless and rude. Be the most patient, mature and polite person in the room. (Jamie Margolin, Youth to Power)
    3. Address the elephant in the room: If someone is really testing your limits or being overtly rude or dismissive of you as a young person, don’t be afraid to bring it up. Say, ‘If I were twenty years older and asking the same question, would you talk to me in the same way you’re talking now?’ The adult might get defensive, but just keep holding them accountable for their behavior and pointing out the truth. Speak your truth to power! Always, always, always. (Jamie Margolin, Youth to Power)
    4. Provide your audience with an emotional or personal connection to the issues of climate action and climate justice. Explain why you’re passionate – others should understand how and why this crisis affects you, your community, and future generations.
    5. Be patient and be respectful. You don’t want your passion to be mistaken for misdirected anger or misunderstanding. Not everyone may share the same perspective of you, but that could in part be because they were raised in a different setting or time, or have a different educational or cultural background. You want to inspire others to get behind you!
    It’s best to go into these conversations knowing what you’re up against:
    • Patronizing and invalidation
    • Lack of trust in your ability
    • Systemic silencing of your voice
    • Oftentimes, lack of funding and resources
    Download Tips
    latinx climate protesters march with a banner that says "presente"
  • Protection of Land & Other Resources

  • Pumpkin Pancakes

    Pumpkin Pancakes

    From Blogilates

    Have leftover cans of pumpkin puree?
    Don’t let your food go to waste! Make healthy, veg-friendly pumpkin pancakes the morning after.
    pancake ingredients

    INGREDIENTS ⁠⠀

    • 2 large eggs⁠⠀
    • 4 tbsp canned organic pumpkin OR pure pumpkin puree⁠⠀
    • 2 tbsp cashew butter⁠⠀
    • 2 tbsp monk fruit sweetener⁠⠀
    • 2 tbsp almond milk⁠⠀
    • 2/3 C almond flour⁠⠀
    • 2 tbsp coconut flour⁠⠀
    • 1 tsp baking powder⁠⠀
    • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice⠀
    • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon⁠⠀
    • Optional: 1 egg white (if you want extra fluffy pancakes)⁠⠀

    INSTRUCTIONS

    1. Mix everything together, except for the one egg white! Batter should be thick.⁠⠀
    2. OPTIONAL: Whip the egg white until stiff peaks form. Gently old into the pancake batter⁠⠀
    3. Heat your pan to medium low heat. ⁠⠀
    4. Spray pan with coconut oil.⁠⠀
    5. Dollop pancake batter on and flip when bubbles form on top and bottom is solid enough to flip.⁠⠀
    6. Top with fall fruit and nuts…pecans, walnuts, figs, pears, apples etc.⁠
  • Storytelling & Communications

    • Read the Good Energy Playbook to get inspiration on how to portray the climate crisis in any storyline, across every genre, to create relevant, authentic, and, above all, entertaining stories.
    • Download the Climate Story Lab Toolbox to engage in climate communication strategies and climate storytelling.
    • Watch NRDC’s panel “Beyond Apocalypse: Alternative Climate Futures in Film and TV” that brought together filmmakers & climate leaders to discuss how entertainment stories can help us see, feel, and build the climate future we want.
    • Follow climate scientists and experts to stay in the know on important climate news, policies and actions.
    • Join Creators for Justice and support climate-justice groups that need pro-bono creative assistance.
    • Understand “why every city needs a climate storyteller” and envision how your skills can be used to create media that incorporates climate storytelling.
    • Document the physical and emotional effects of climate change over time. This can be used as an educational tool and could result as a photo series, multimedia project, or even a short film such as “Lowland Kids”.
    • Read and share personal climate stories from Our Climate Voices to help raise awareness about how climate change is personally impacting communities.
    • Have a story to tell about how you’re making a difference in climate issues in your community? Submit your story to Passport to Change to share how your work is aligning with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and to read the stories and insights of other youth climate activists from around the world.
  • Vegan Cheesecake

    Vegan Cheesecake

    From Delish

    Prep Time: 2 Hours 20 Minutes | Total Time: 6 Hours 50 Minutes
    Servings: 10

    INGREDIENTS

    • 1 c. quick-cooking oats
    • 1/2 c. almonds
    • 3/4 c. unsweetened coconut flakes
    • 3 tbsp. maple syrup
    • 1/4 tsp. kosher salt
    • 1/2 c. almond butter
    • 3/4 c. coconut milk
    • 1 1/4 c. granulated sugar, divided
    • 2 c. cashews (soaked overnight, drained and rinsed)
    • 1/2 c. refined coconut oil, melted, plus more for pan
    • 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
    • 1 (8-oz.) container vegan cream cheese
    • 3 c. fresh or frozen raspberries, divided

    DIRECTIONS

    1. 3 c. fresh or frozen raspberries, divided
    2. Make the crust: Pulse oats, almonds, and coconut flakes in a food processor until fine crumbs form. Transfer to a medium bowl and fold in maple syrup, salt, and almond butter.
    3. Grease the bottom of a 8″ or 9” spring form pan with coconut oil and press crust evenly into bottom of pan.
    4. Make the filling: In a small saucepan over medium heat, mix coconut milk and ¾ cup sugar and heat just until sugar is dissolved. Let cool.
    5. In a high-powered blender, blend soaked cashews, cooled coconut milk mixture, coconut oil, and vanilla until thick and smooth. Blend in vegan cream cheese.
    6. Pour filling mixture into crust and chill in freezer for at least 3 hours and up to overnight.
    7. Make the fruit topping: Bring 2 cups raspberries and remaining 1/2 cup sugar to a low boil over medium heat and continue to simmer until sauce is slightly thickened, about 8 to 10 minutes. Let cool, then fold in remaining 1 cup berries.
    8. Assemble the cake: Remove cheesecake from springform pan and let thaw at room temperature 1 hour before spooning raspberry topping all over top of cake.
  • Climate Justice & Intersectional Environmentalism

  • Vegan Pumpkin Pie

    Vegan Pumpkin Pie

    From Delish

    Prep Time: 15 Minutes | Total Time: 3 Hours 45 Minutes
    Servings: 8

    Ingredients:

    For the Crust

    • Cooking spray
    • 1 1/2 c. pecans
    • 2/3 c. old fashioned oats
    • 3 tbsp. packed brown sugar
    • 1/4 tsp. kosher salt
    • 3 tbsp. coconut oil, melted and cooled

    For the Filling

    • 1 (15-oz.) can pumpkin puree
    • 1 c. coconut milk
    • 3/4 c. packed brown sugar
    • 2 tbsp. Cornstarch
    • 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
    • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
    • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
    • 1/2 tsp. ground ginger
    • 1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg

    For the Topping

    • 1 (13.5-oz.) can full fat coconut cream, refrigerated overnight (Taste Of Thai works best)
    • 3 tbsp. powdered sugar
    • Pinch kosher salt

    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to 375°. Grease a 9” pie plate with cooking spray.
    2. In a food processor, add pecans, oats, sugar, and salt and pulse until coarsely chopped. Add coconut oil and pulse until well combined and a dough forms.
    3. Press mixture into prepared dish in an even layer. Line crust with parchment paper and fill with dried beans or pie weights. Blind bake 15 minutes, then remove parchment and weights and bake 15 minutes more.
    4. Make filling: In a large bowl, whisk together filling ingredients and pour over crust. Bake until only slightly jiggly in the center, 50 to 55 minutes, covering the crust with foil if it starts to get too dark. Let cool completely.
    5. Make topping: Open can of coconut cream and scoop out hardened cream on top. In a large bowl, using a hand mixer, beat coconut cream, powdered sugar, and salt together until stiff peaks form.
    6. Serve pie with whipped coconut cream.
  • You're amazing at

    Science & Research

    • Use this remote sensing tool from The Environmental Defense Fund and Google to map local air pollution. Neighborhoods can use the data to reduce emissions and target communities most at risk for health issues.
    • Dive into the Clean Power Plan and understand how states can meet their emissions reduction goals.
    • Help reduce actions that diminish against the roles of independent scientists! Contact the Union of Concerned Scientists to protect scientists involved in environmental policy-making from political influence.
    • Set science-based targets for reducing greenhouse emissions within your company or organization. 1,000+ other companies are taking action!
    • Request help from a woman in STEMM through 500 Women Scientists: a resource for journalists, educators, policy makers, scientists, and anyone needing scientific expertise.
    • Amplify polling on climate change, public policy and the energy transition! This supports research
      done by Climate Nexus in collaboration with the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication.
    • If you’re a healthcare worker or physician, use the American College of Physicians’ Climate Change Toolkit to help reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in your practice. Physicians can play a substantial role in addressing climate change by advocating for climate change adaptation and mitigation policies, and by educating themselves about climate change and how it affects public and individual health, and the potential health threats it may pose to their community. 
    • Learn from the National Phenology Network about why phenology (the study of recurring biological events) is so important for understanding climate change and how you can get involved with making your own observations.
  • Garden Herb Biscuits

    Garden Herb Biscuits

    From Bitter Sweet

    Prep Time: 10 Minutes | Cook Time: 20 Minutes | Additional Time: 10 Minutes | Total Time: 40 Minutes
    Servings: 6-8 Tall Biscuits

    Ingredients

    • 2 1/2 Cups All Purpose Flour
    • 2 1/2 Teaspoons Baking Powder
    • 1 Teaspoon Coarse Sea Salt or Kosher Salt
    • 1/4 Teaspoon Freshly Ground Black Pepper
    • 2 Tablespoons Fresh Chopped Parsley
    • 2 Tablespoons Fresh Chopped Chives
    • 1 1/2 Teaspoon Fresh Thyme
    • 1/4 Cup Vegan Butter
    • 4 Ounces (1/2 Package) Vegan Cream Cheese
    • 1 Cup Finely Grated Carrot or Zucchini (or a Mix of Both)
    • 3/4 Cup Plain Non-Dairy Milk
    • 1 Teaspoon Apple Cider Vinegar
    • Additional Melted Vegan Butter (Optional)

    Instructions

    1. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees and line a baking sheet with a silicone baking mat or piece of parchment paper. Set aside.
    2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, pepper, and fresh herbs. Make sure the greenery is well distributed throughout the dry mixture.
    3. Cut the butter and cream cheese into tablespoon-sized pieces before adding them in next, and use a fork or pastry cutter to further incorporate the two. Once you achieve a coarse consistency where there are no chunks of fat remaining that are any larger than peas, toss in the carrot and/or zucchini shreds.
    4. Finally stir in both the non-dairy milk and vinegar at once, and mix with a wide spatula just until the thick batter comes together. If you’re into the old-fashion way of doing it, you can also mix by hand, of course.
      On a very lightly floured surface, pat out the dough to about 1 – 1 1/2 inches tall. Use a 2-inch round cookie cutter to cut out the biscuits, and space them out equally across your prepared baking sheet. Gather up any scrapes, pat back into shape, and cut again, until the dough is all used up. You should get 6 – 8 tall biscuits out of the mix.
    5. If desired, brush a small amount of melted butter across the tops of the biscuits for an extra rich flavor, and then pop them into the oven. Bake for 18 – 22 minutes, until golden brown all over. Let cool for at least 10 minutes before eating, just so that you don’t burn your mouth!

    Notes: For savory flavors that would be right at home at any Thanksgiving feast, consider swapping out the chives for a mixture of fresh rosemary, sage, and tarragon. Finely grated sweet potato or parsnips would make great substitutes for the carrot or zucchini, too.

  • Vegan Stuffing

    Vegan Stuffing

    From Delish

    Prep Time: 25 Minutes | Total Time: 1 Hour 40 Minutes
    Servings: 8

    Ingredients:

    • 1 loaf of crusty country bread
    • Cooking spray
    • 3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
    • 1 large onion, diced
    • 4 stalks celery, thinly sliced
    • 6 cloves garlic, minced
    • 2 c. vegetable stock or water
    • Kosher salt
    • Freshly ground black pepper
    • 3 sprigs thyme, stems removed
    • 2 sprigs sage, finely chopped
    • 1 sprig rosemary, finely chopped

    Directions

    1. The day before: Slice bread into 1″ cubes and leave out overnight to dry out. (Alternately, place bread on baking sheets and bake at 200º for 20 minutes.)
    2. Preheat oven to 350° and grease a 3-quart baking dish with cooking spray.
    3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat, add onion, and cook until lightly charred in some spots, about 5 minutes. Add celery and garlic and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until celery starts looking translucent. Add vegetable stock to pan with veggies and scrape up any browned bits with a wooden spoon.
    4. Season with salt and pepper.
    5. Mix bread with vegetable mixture and chopped herbs until well combined and transfer to prepared pan.
    6. Cover tightly with foil and bake for 40 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake until stuffing is golden brown and crisp on top, about 35 minutes more.
  • Easy Vegan Green Bean Casserole

    Easy Vegan Green Bean Casserole

    From Delish

    Prep Time: 15 Minutes | Total Time: 1 hr 20 Minutes
    Servings: 4

    Ingredients:

    For the Onion Topping

    • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
    • 1 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
    • Kosher salt
    • Freshly ground black pepper
    • 3 tbsp. all-purpose flour
    • 2 tbsp. Panko bread crumbs

    For Casserole

    • 1 lb. green beans, trimmed
    • 6 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
    • 2 medium shallots, finely chopped
    • 8 oz. sliced mushrooms
    • Kosher salt
    • Freshly ground black pepper
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1/4 c. all-purpose flour
    • 3 c. almond milk

    Directions

    1. Make onion topping: Preheat oven to broil on medium and line a medium baking sheet with aluminum foil. In a medium bowl, toss onion with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Add flour and Panko and toss to coat onions.
    2. Broil, tossing every 2 to 3 minutes, until onions are crisp and golden, about 6 to 8 minutes in total. Turn oven down to 375°.
    3. Prepare an ice bath. In a large pot of boiling water, add green beans and cook until bright green, about 6 minutes. With a slotted spoon or tongs, quickly transfer green beans to ice bath to cool, then drain and transfer to a large bowl.
    4. In a large ovenproof skillet over medium heat, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil.
    5. Add shallots and cook, stirring occasionally until tender, about 5 minutes.
    6. Add mushrooms and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until mushrooms are golden, about 5 minutes more. Stir in garlic then transfer mixture to the bowl with the green beans.
    7. Heat remaining 4 tablespoons of olive oil in the same skillet over medium heat. Whisk in flour and cook until golden, about 2 minutes. Gradually whisk in almond milk and bring to a simmer. Cook until thickened, about 4 minutes.
    8. Remove from heat then add green bean mixture and toss until even combined. Transfer mixture to a medium casserole dish.
    9. Bake until warmed through and bubbling around the edges, about 20 minutes. Top with “fried” onions and bake 5 minutes more.
  • Climate Issue

    Action Items:

    Climate Issue

    Technology & STEMM

    • Increase equity and access in STEMM education, especially for communities that are disproportionately affected by climate change. Here’s an example of a STEMM afterschool program.
    • For teachers: bring space, our universe, and our planet into your classroom.
    • Learn more about IoT devices and innovative initiatives to combat climate change (Interact, IoT for all).
    • Read this Vox article to learn about the International Energy Agency’s technological innovations to achieve net-zero carbon emissions and recommendations for how to move forward.
    • Study the areas of STEMM and technology that speak most to your interests and experiences to better support research and development in those sectors.
    • Request help from a woman in STEMM through 500 Women Scientists: a resource for journalists, educators, policy makers, scientists, and anyone needing scientific expertise.
    • Advocate for the regulation of social media misinformation on climate change. You can increase your media literacy and take action here.
    • Apply to grants that support research to understand and combat climate change. Check out the US Environmental Protection Agency’s grants and ClimateWork’s grants database.
    • Learn more about climate indicators from this interactive ArcGIS StoryMap created by the World Meteorological Organization.

    Renewable Energies

    Finance & Divestments

    • Explore the whole Banking on Climate Chaos report to get a full picture of how the runaway funding for fossil fuel extraction and infrastructure fuels climate chaos and threatens the lives and livelihoods of millions.
    • Call your bank and demand divestment from fossil fuels with the help of Stop the Money Pipeline.
    • Disinvest from carbon-heavy industries and investments by using this guide. Making sure your financial portfolio matches your beliefs is a sound investment in our collective future. Many mutual funds and retirement accounts offer clean energy and carbon-free options, and various groups have helped demonstrate the risk of carbon-heavy investments in light of a worldwide shift toward cleaner energy.
    • Support the Adaptation Fund which uses grants to finance localized projects and programmes that help vulnerable communities in developing countries adapt and build resilience to climate change.
    • Build public pressure to create “green” banks and encourage banks to subsidize adaptation projects
      for sustainable housing development.

    Food, Agriculture & Regeneration

    Protection of Land & Other Resources

    Storytelling & Communications

    • Read the Good Energy Playbook to get inspiration on how to portray the climate crisis in any storyline, across every genre, to create relevant, authentic, and, above all, entertaining stories.
    • Download the Climate Story Lab Toolbox to engage in climate communication strategies and climate storytelling.
    • Watch NRDC’s panel “Beyond Apocalypse: Alternative Climate Futures in Film and TV” that brought together filmmakers & climate leaders to discuss how entertainment stories can help us see, feel, and build the climate future we want.
    • Follow climate scientists and experts to stay in the know on important climate news, policies and actions.
    • Join Creators for Justice and support climate-justice groups that need pro-bono creative assistance.
    • Understand “why every city needs a climate storyteller” and envision how your skills can be used to create media that incorporates climate storytelling.
    • Document the physical and emotional effects of climate change over time. This can be used as an educational tool and could result as a photo series, multimedia project, or even a short film such as “Lowland Kids”.
    • Read and share personal climate stories from Our Climate Voices to help raise awareness about how climate change is personally impacting communities.
    • Have a story to tell about how you’re making a difference in climate issues in your community? Submit your story to Passport to Change to share how your work is aligning with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and to read the stories and insights of other youth climate activists from around the world.

    Climate Justice & Intersectional Environmentalism

    Download the complete Action Guide

    Time Commitment

    Read More

    Skill Set and Superpowers

    Read More

    Where You Live

    Read More

    Housing Situation

    Read More

  • Educational

    • Stronger and more frequent superstorms, raging wildfires, and other disasters are already forcing millions of people from their homes. Learn about climate-driven migration and sign up for updates on how you can help fight for a more just and safe place to call home.
    • Incorporate curriculum/discussion guides in the classroom that bring in topics related to climate change and our relationship with the planet. Refer to this Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report which helps summarize important climate issues for educators.
    • Inform co-workers and company employees on how they can be more sustainable at their work. Whether it’s recycling in the office, avoiding single use plastics, or sharing materials digitally rather than printing them – you can present these ideas during your lunch hour!
    • Learn from the National Phenology Network about why phenology (the study of recurring biological events) is so important for understanding climate change and how you can get involved with making your own observations.
    • Put books about climate change in your nearest little free library. Start exploring a list of kid books in our Educators Toolkit.
    • Organize local screenings for your community with films that speak to climate issues (we recommend I am Greta, Before The Flood, Kiss The Ground, and Gather!).
    • Encourage Climate Literacy in your classroom. Utilize our Educators Toolkit to help educate your students on climate change and how they can make a difference.
    • Empower your school to speak up for climate action! Use these free materials from Schools for Climate Action to pass a powerful, non-partisan climate resolution in your school district.
    • Get educated on movements that are happening globally, such as the peasant movement in the Philippines. Learn about its relation to climate justice and how you can help support victims and survivors of state-sanctioned violence in the fight for land and human rights. 
    • Inspire your community and invite a Climate Reality Leader to give you & your friends the latest multimedia presentation about the impacts of climate change. Then join Climate Reality’s 100% Committed campaign and pledge to help your community, business, or school shift to 100% renewable electricity.
    • Join Environment America for an underwater hike of six marine protected areas to explore some unique, diverse ecosystems – each of which are success stories demonstrating the power and hope of restoring and protecting our most precious underwater wildernesses. Then sign this petition to help ensure the conservation and protection of 30 percent of our oceans by 2030.
    • Take a course on environmental science or environmental policy. There are many courses that also overlap with topics in the humanities, such as environmental racism or development.
  • Skill Set & Superpowers

    Action Items:

    Skill Set & Superpowers

    Science & Research

    • Use this remote sensing tool from The Environmental Defense Fund and Google to map local air pollution. Neighborhoods can use the data to reduce emissions and target communities most at risk for health issues.
    • Dive into the Clean Power Plan and understand how states can meet their emissions reduction goals.
    • Help reduce actions that diminish against the roles of independent scientists! Contact the Union of Concerned Scientists to protect scientists involved in environmental policy-making from political influence.
    • Set science-based targets for reducing greenhouse emissions within your company or organization. 1,000+ other companies are taking action!
    • Request help from a woman in STEMM through 500 Women Scientists: a resource for journalists, educators, policy makers, scientists, and anyone needing scientific expertise.
    • Amplify polling on climate change, public policy and the energy transition! This supports research
      done by Climate Nexus in collaboration with the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication.
    • If you’re a healthcare worker or physician, use the American College of Physicians’ Climate Change Toolkit to help reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in your practice. Physicians can play a substantial role in addressing climate change by advocating for climate change adaptation and mitigation policies, and by educating themselves about climate change and how it affects public and individual health, and the potential health threats it may pose to their community. 
    • Learn from the National Phenology Network about why phenology (the study of recurring biological events) is so important for understanding climate change and how you can get involved with making your own observations.

    Educational

    • Stronger and more frequent superstorms, raging wildfires, and other disasters are already forcing millions of people from their homes. Learn about climate-driven migration and sign up for updates on how you can help fight for a more just and safe place to call home.
    • Incorporate curriculum/discussion guides in the classroom that bring in topics related to climate change and our relationship with the planet. Refer to this Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report which helps summarize important climate issues for educators.
    • Inform co-workers and company employees on how they can be more sustainable at their work. Whether it’s recycling in the office, avoiding single use plastics, or sharing materials digitally rather than printing them – you can present these ideas during your lunch hour!
    • Learn from the National Phenology Network about why phenology (the study of recurring biological events) is so important for understanding climate change and how you can get involved with making your own observations.
    • Put books about climate change in your nearest little free library. Start exploring a list of kid books in our Educators Toolkit.
    • Organize local screenings for your community with films that speak to climate issues (we recommend I am Greta, Before The Flood, Kiss The Ground, and Gather!).
    • Encourage Climate Literacy in your classroom. Utilize our Educators Toolkit to help educate your students on climate change and how they can make a difference.
    • Empower your school to speak up for climate action! Use these free materials from Schools for Climate Action to pass a powerful, non-partisan climate resolution in your school district.
    • Get educated on movements that are happening globally, such as the peasant movement in the Philippines. Learn about its relation to climate justice and how you can help support victims and survivors of state-sanctioned violence in the fight for land and human rights. 
    • Inspire your community and invite a Climate Reality Leader to give you & your friends the latest multimedia presentation about the impacts of climate change. Then join Climate Reality’s 100% Committed campaign and pledge to help your community, business, or school shift to 100% renewable electricity.
    • Join Environment America for an underwater hike of six marine protected areas to explore some unique, diverse ecosystems – each of which are success stories demonstrating the power and hope of restoring and protecting our most precious underwater wildernesses. Then sign this petition to help ensure the conservation and protection of 30 percent of our oceans by 2030.
    • Take a course on environmental science or environmental policy. There are many courses that also overlap with topics in the humanities, such as environmental racism or development.

    Advocacy & Leadership

    • Learn about how to call Congress for the issues you’re passionate about.
    • Research how to protest safely before hitting the streets.
    • Demand Recycling Stations in your school, place of work or religious organization. You can apply for recycling grants to help fund your initiative at school!
    • Become a trained “The Oceanic Standard” advocate and drive responsible consumption in your community! Reach out to: theoceanicstandard@oceanic.global to join the next training.
    • Start a Zero Hour Sister Chapter. If you don’t have a climate justice group in your area, become the leader of one. Apply to create a chapter here.
    • Back a scientist running for office. Few members of Congress identify as scientists, which many science-minded advocates say is part of the problem when it comes to climate legislation. (Curbed)
    • Check out XR Youth’s US Guidebook on how to organize actions in COVID times. This is a great resource for new organizers! You can also learn how to organize a support network in your city: this guide from XR Youth US, Zero Hour, IIYC & Future Coalition explains how to effectively mobilize an interconnected web of group chats, youth, and resources.
    • Lead a school climate strike with Fridays for Future.
    • Help NRDC save NYC composting!
    • Set up meetings with city leaders to discuss ways they can set climate science-based targets. Use this guide to help inform your conversation and serve as a resource.

    Creative & Art

    • Are you responsible for a creative institution? Do you work in the entertainment industry? Join the Creatives Industries Pact for Sustainable Action!
    • Sign up to be an Artist for the Earth, a global network campaign that connects and engages the public in climate movement using art.
    • Interested in incorporating climate storytelling in your work? Check out the Climate Story Lab Toolbox from Exposure Labs and Doc Society.
    • Collaborate with Working Films! If you are someone whose passion projects revolve around social justice, expand your knowledge with the opportunities Working Films offers here.
    • Create a climate story with your students, church friends, or other community members to share personal stories of climate change and help others understand how it is relevant to their lives. A climate story is a personal account of climate change from your experience and observations, ranging from despair to hope, from loss to resolve. It is descriptive and makes an emotional connection to climate change.
    • Become a Climate Stories Ambassador.
    • Join Creators for Justice and support climate-justice groups that need pro-bono creative assistance.
    • Do you enjoy working with film? Use Doc Society’s Impact Field Guide & Toolkit as a source on how to make an even bigger impact as a film creator.

    Administrative & Organizing

    • Organize friends to attend a climate action strike → Locate them here!
    • Start an Earth Guardian Crew and lead youth toward a fight for climate justice!
    • Inspire your community and invite a Climate Reality Leader to give you & your friends the latest multimedia presentation about the impacts of climate change. Then join Climate Reality’s 100% Committed campaign and pledge to help your community, business, or school shift to 100% renewable electricity.
    • Tell Wall Street and Congress: Put People Before Polluters. Demand that banks, asset managers and companies stop funding, insuring and investing in climate destruction.
    • Work to stop government subsidies for the beef industry. The US government alone spends $38 billion each year to subsidize the meat and dairy industries, but only 0.04 percent of that ($17 million) each year to subsidize fruits and vegetables. Needless to say, when the price of something is lower, people tend to buy more of it. (Rainforest Alliance)
    • Join your local Sunrise Movement chapter to work with other like-minded individuals fighting to demand climate action, end the corruptive influence of fossil fuel executives on our politics, and elect leaders who stand up for the health and wellbeing of all people.
    • Start a student climate organization at your school or university!
    • Start a campaign to eliminate the use of single use plastics on campus.
    • Organize local screenings for your community with films that speak to climate issues (even if it’s Moana)!
    • Participate in a lobby day (such as Climate Generation’s annual Youth Lobby Day), or schedule a meeting with your representative on your own.

    Download the complete Action Guide

    Download.pdf

    Housing Situation

    Read More

    Time Commitment

    Read More

    Where You Live

    Read More

    Climate Issue

    Read More

  • You're excellent at

    Advocacy & Leadership

    • Learn about how to call Congress for the issues you’re passionate about.
    • Research how to protest safely before hitting the streets.
    • Demand Recycling Stations in your school, place of work or religious organization. You can apply for recycling grants to help fund your initiative at school!
    • Become a trained “The Oceanic Standard” advocate and drive responsible consumption in your community! Reach out to: theoceanicstandard@oceanic.global to join the next training.
    • Start a Zero Hour Sister Chapter. If you don’t have a climate justice group in your area, become the leader of one. Apply to create a chapter here.
    • Back a scientist running for office. Few members of Congress identify as scientists, which many science-minded advocates say is part of the problem when it comes to climate legislation. (Curbed)
    • Check out XR Youth’s US Guidebook on how to organize actions in COVID times. This is a great resource for new organizers! You can also learn how to organize a support network in your city: this guide from XR Youth US, Zero Hour, IIYC & Future Coalition explains how to effectively mobilize an interconnected web of group chats, youth, and resources.
    • Lead a school climate strike with Fridays for Future.
    • Help NRDC save NYC composting!
    • Set up meetings with city leaders to discuss ways they can set climate science-based targets. Use this guide to help inform your conversation and serve as a resource.
  • Earth Justice

    Join EarthJustice to Defend the Arctic Refuge from Reckless Oil Drilling & Exploration.

  • Housing Situation Action Items

    Action Items:

    Type of Home

    No items found

    Download the complete Action Guide

    Time Commitment

    Read More

    Skill Set and Superpowers

    Read More

    Where You Live

    Read More

    Climate Issue

    Read More

  • Where You Live

    Action Items:

    Where You Live

    No items found

    Download the complete Action Guide

    Time Commitment

    Read More

    Skill Set and Superpowers

    Read More

    Housing Situation

    Read More

    Climate Issue

    Read More

  • Time Commitment

    Action Items:

    Time Commitment

    1 to 4 Hours

    • Join/attend your neighborhood council to see what climate initiatives currently exist and how you can incorporate more ideas around regenerative thinking and climate justice.
    • Participate in a Climate Justice Accountability Program on behalf of your business or organization.
    • Defend our national monuments: Deliver this petition from Earthjustice to the Department of Interior and the Department of Commerce.
    • Defend the Arctic Refuge from Reckless Oil Drilling & Exploration by delivering this public message from EarthJustice to U.S. Congress.
    • Organize a clean up in your community! Invite friends & find a local park or beach. (National CleanUp Day)
    • Run a business or organization? Host a Workshop & Strategy Session with Movement Generation to learn how to engage staff and members as they integrate an ecological lens into their work.
    • Dive deeper into climate topics. Pick three episodes from the Green Dreamer podcast to learn more about these important issues.
    • Need a weekend away from the city? Visit National Parks! This helps provide funding to protect these beautiful spots in nature. It’s also an educational way to learn about the environment.
    • Talk with your landlord about how renewable energy can save them money in the long run and improve the property.
    • Strengthen protections for farmworker children by sending an email to your congressman showing your support for the CARE Act (Children’s Act for Responsible Employment).
    • Join a community garden and invite your neighbors. This is an educational and fun way to learn about our relationship with food and the planet. Here are some tips and tricks if you’re looking to start one.

    4 to 8 Hours

    Continuous Action

    Download the complete Action Guide

    Find Action Steps Based On:

    Where You Live

    Read More

    Housing Situation

    Read More

    Climate Issue

    Read More

    Skill Set & Superpowers

    Read More

  • You are

    Creative & Art

    • Are you responsible for a creative institution? Do you work in the entertainment industry? Join the Creatives Industries Pact for Sustainable Action!
    • Sign up to be an Artist for the Earth, a global network campaign that connects and engages the public in climate movement using art.
    • Interested in incorporating climate storytelling in your work? Check out the Climate Story Lab Toolbox from Exposure Labs and Doc Society.
    • Collaborate with Working Films! If you are someone whose passion projects revolve around social justice, expand your knowledge with the opportunities Working Films offers here.
    • Create a climate story with your students, church friends, or other community members to share personal stories of climate change and help others understand how it is relevant to their lives. A climate story is a personal account of climate change from your experience and observations, ranging from despair to hope, from loss to resolve. It is descriptive and makes an emotional connection to climate change.
    • Become a Climate Stories Ambassador.
    • Join Creators for Justice and support climate-justice groups that need pro-bono creative assistance.
    • Do you enjoy working with film? Use Doc Society’s Impact Field Guide & Toolkit as a source on how to make an even bigger impact as a film creator.
  • Thanksgiving Roast

    Thanksgiving Roast

    From Hot For Food

    This roast has layers of savory mushroom lentil stew, mashed sweet potato, and an apple cranberry sauce all wrapped up into a puff pastry package.

    Prep Time: 50 minutes | Cook Time: 40 Minutes | Total Time: 90 Minutes
    Servings: 8

    Ingredients:

    Apple Cranberry Sauce

    • 1 cup dried cranberries
    • 3/4 cup water
    • 1/2 cup unsweetened apple sauce
    • 1 apple, peeled and small diced
    • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
    • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
    • 1/4 teaspoon all spice
    • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
    • Sweet Potato Mash
    • 4 cups peeled and diced sweet potato (about 2 medium-sized potatoes)
    • 1/4 cup unsweetened plant-based milk
    • 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
    • 1 tablespoon vegan butter/margarine
    • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon all spice
    • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
    • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

    Mushroom & Lentil Stew

    • 1 cup finely chopped yellow onion
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped celery
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped carrot
    • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    • 1/2 teaspoon thyme, fresh or ground
    • 1/2 teaspoon sage
    • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
    • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
    • 3 portobello mushrooms, roughly chopped
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 cup cooked green lentils
    • 3/4 cup low-sodium vegetable stock
    • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
    • 1 tablespoon water

    Other

    • 1 package vegan puff pastry (thawed from frozen in the fridge – should be kept cold)
    • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour, for rolling the pastry
    • Vegetable oil, to oil bread pan
    • Parchment paper

    Directions

    1. Bring a pot of water to a boil and cook sweet potatoes until they are fork tender. Drain and set them aside.
    2. Place all the ingredients for the apple cranberry sauce in a sauce pan and bring to a simmer. Stir occasionally, and once it’s bubbling reduce heat to a low simmer and allow the sauce to reduce for approximately 20 minutes. It should be thick and darker. Set aside and allow to cool.
    3. Meanwhile, mash the sweet potatoes in the pot you cooked them in and add the remaining ingredients. Stir and mash to combine well, set aside, and allow to cool.
    4. To prepare the mushroom and lentil stew, heat a large pan over medium heat and add vegetable oil. Sauté onion, celery, and carrot together for 4-5 minutes until soft and mostly cooked through.
      Add thyme, sage, nutmeg, sea salt, and ground black pepper and continue to stir for another minute or so. Then add in the mushrooms and cook for about 4-5 minutes until the mushrooms are mostly cooked through.
    5. Add the garlic and lentils and combine well, stirring for 2-3 minutes.
    6. Add the low-sodium vegetable stock and bring up to a simmer. Once simmering, combine the cornstarch and water in a small bowl, mix into a slurry and then add that to the stew. Stir over medium-low heat for 1-2 minutes until thickened and there isn’t too much liquid remaining in the mixture. Turn off the heat and allow this mixture to cool down before adding to the pastry.
    7. Preheat the oven to 375°F/190°C.
    8. Sprinkle flour over your rolling surface, hands, and rolling pin before handling the pastry. Your puff pastry should unfold once into a rectangle shape. Roll this out to 1/8″ thick and into a rectangle approximately 17″ wide x 12″ tall. You’ll need to roll a bit, then flip the dough ensuring the rolling surface is floured to prevent the dough from sticking. Make sure to continually flour the rolling pin and your hands.
    9. Make a cut about 3/4 of the way across. Cut from top to bottom (the shortest edge) so you have one large piece (approximately 11″ wide x 12″ tall) that will fit in a bread pan, and a smaller piece (approximately 6″ wide x 12″ tall) that will fit on top.
    10. Cut a piece of parchment paper to fit in the width and longest sides of the bread pan with some overhang. Lightly oil the exposed narrower sides of the bread pan.
    11. Gently place the largest piece of pastry into the bread pan, fitting it into the corners, and overlapping or folding any excess at the corners. Gently press it into all sides of the pan.
    12. If you have any gaps, you can cut a small piece of the excess overhang from the side and use a small amount of water on a finger to glue the dough pieces together.Layer the sweet potato mash on the bottom. It should be higher than an inch. Then add all of the mushroom lentil stew, and then all of the apple cranberry sauce.
    13. Place the top piece of pastry across the top and gently press along the edge of the pan to seal it. Fold over the edges all the way around to form a crust. It can be rustic and uneven. Press the edges together with the prongs of a fork.
      Using a sharp knife, cut 3 to 4 small slits along the top to allow steam to escape.
    14. Bake for approximately 30 to 40 minutes on the middle rack. The pastry should be a dark golden color and the centre should be hot to the touch when you insert a knife or fork.
    15. Once baked, allow it to rest for at least 20 minutes in the pan before lifting it out with the parchment paper.

    Tips

    • If you want to prepare anything in advance, make all the fillings and refrigerate. Then roll out the pastry and assemble the whole roast right before baking for the best results.
    • A nice presentation idea is to use a piece of twine to tie the excess parchment around the roast. It helps with cutting as well and holding it together as you slice it.
  • You are

    Administrative & Organizing

    • Organize friends to attend a climate action strike → Locate them here!
    • Start an Earth Guardian Crew and lead youth toward a fight for climate justice!
    • Inspire your community and invite a Climate Reality Leader to give you & your friends the latest multimedia presentation about the impacts of climate change. Then join Climate Reality’s 100% Committed campaign and pledge to help your community, business, or school shift to 100% renewable electricity.
    • Tell Wall Street and Congress: Put People Before Polluters. Demand that banks, asset managers and companies stop funding, insuring and investing in climate destruction.
    • Work to stop government subsidies for the beef industry. The US government alone spends $38 billion each year to subsidize the meat and dairy industries, but only 0.04 percent of that ($17 million) each year to subsidize fruits and vegetables. Needless to say, when the price of something is lower, people tend to buy more of it. (Rainforest Alliance)
    • Join your local Sunrise Movement chapter to work with other like-minded individuals fighting to demand climate action, end the corruptive influence of fossil fuel executives on our politics, and elect leaders who stand up for the health and wellbeing of all people.
    • Start a student climate organization at your school or university!
    • Start a campaign to eliminate the use of single use plastics on campus.
    • Organize local screenings for your community with films that speak to climate issues (even if it’s Moana)!
    • Participate in a lobby day (such as Climate Generation’s annual Youth Lobby Day), or schedule a meeting with your representative on your own.
  • Quinoa & Apple Stuffing

    Quinoa & Apple Stuffing

    From Hot For Food

    This simple homemade stuffing is full of hearty ingredients like protein-packed quinoa, tart cranberries and sweet apple bits.

    Prep Time: 10 Minutes | Cook Time: 20 Minutes | Total Time: 30 Minutes
    Servings: 6-8

    INGREDIENTS:

    • 1 cup quinoa
    • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt + 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
    • 1 1/2 cup + 1/2 cup low-sodium vegetable stock
    • 1 diced apple
    • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
    • 2 tablespoon + 1 tablespoon olive oil
    • 1 cup finely chopped leek
    • 3/4 cup finely chopped celery
    • 1 finely chopped shallot
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage
    • 1 teaspoon finely chopped rosemary
    • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
    • 1/2 cup dried cranberries
    • 1/3 cup finely chopped parsley

    Directions:

    1. Rinse the quinoa in a sieve under water for approximately 30 seconds and drain thoroughly. Add it to a pot with the low-sodium vegetable stock and sea salt, and bring to a boil.
    2. Once boiling, stir in the diced apple and cover with a lid. Reduce the heat to low and cook for 10 minutes. Once all the water is absorbed, remove the pot from the heat and stir in fresh thyme and 2 tablespoons of olive oil.
    3. While the quinoa is cooking, you can create the other component to the stuffing. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a pan over medium heat and sauté the leek, celery, and shallot for 4 minutes until soft.
    4. Add in the garlic, sage, rosemary, nutmeg, sea salt, and ground black pepper, and cook for 2 minutes. You may need to reduce the heat to medium-low so you don’t burn the garlic. Then add in a 1/2 cup of low-sodium vegetable stock and simmer, stirring occasionally for 5 minutes.
    5. Add in dried cranberries and parsley and cook for another 2 minutes. Mix this into the quinoa and apple component and serve warm.

    TIPS
    You can make this dish ahead of time and then reheat in the oven before serving.

  • You can spend

    1 to 4 Hours

    • Join/attend your neighborhood council to see what climate initiatives currently exist and how you can incorporate more ideas around regenerative thinking and climate justice.
    • Participate in a Climate Justice Accountability Program on behalf of your business or organization.
    • Defend our national monuments: Deliver this petition from Earthjustice to the Department of Interior and the Department of Commerce.
    • Defend the Arctic Refuge from Reckless Oil Drilling & Exploration by delivering this public message from EarthJustice to U.S. Congress.
    • Organize a clean up in your community! Invite friends & find a local park or beach. (National CleanUp Day)
    • Run a business or organization? Host a Workshop & Strategy Session with Movement Generation to learn how to engage staff and members as they integrate an ecological lens into their work.
    • Dive deeper into climate topics. Pick three episodes from the Green Dreamer podcast to learn more about these important issues.
    • Need a weekend away from the city? Visit National Parks! This helps provide funding to protect these beautiful spots in nature. It’s also an educational way to learn about the environment.
    • Talk with your landlord about how renewable energy can save them money in the long run and improve the property.
    • Strengthen protections for farmworker children by sending an email to your congressman showing your support for the CARE Act (Children’s Act for Responsible Employment).
    • Join a community garden and invite your neighbors. This is an educational and fun way to learn about our relationship with food and the planet. Here are some tips and tricks if you’re looking to start one.
  • Watch I am Greta on Hulu

  • You can spend

    4 to 8 Hours

  • Books To Read In Your Classroom

    Books to read in your classroom

    Download the complete Educators’ Toolkit

    Download.pdf
  • You're dedicated to

    Continuous Action

  • More Resources (Previously Additional Educator Tips)

    More Resources

    • Use these curriculum/discussion guides from Journeys in Film to teach students about the environmental crisis’ impact on clean air, food resources, and the destruction of the Amazon: River of Gold, From The Ashes, and The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind
    • Explore kid-friendly material at NASA’s Climate Kids which talks about weather & climate, atmosphere, water, energy, and plants & animals. It is targeted toward upper-elementary-aged children.
    • Browse the Climate Literacy Dictionary in our Take Action Guide.
    • Incorporate real stories from young people on the front lines of the climate crisis in your classroom. Visit Alliance for Climate Education!
    • Expand your own knowledge of the climate crisis with these online trainings collected by 350.org. Subjects include:
      – Having Climate Conversations
      – Climate Change Science 101
      – Fracking
      – Divestment

    Download the complete Educators’ Toolkit

    Download.pdf
  • Films For Your Classroom

    Films for your Classroom

    For Younger Kids:

    • The Lorax
    • Bill Nye the Science Guy
    • Moana
    • Ice Age: The Meltdown
    • Happy Feet
    • Wall-E

    For Older Kids:

    • Dark Waters
    • Gather
    • The Day After Tomorrow
    • An Inconvenient Truth
    • Chasing Coral
    • Erin Brockovich
    • Before The Flood
    • Okja
    • I Am Greta
  • Climate Literacy Questions

    Climate Literacy Questions

    For Younger Kids:

    For Older kids:

    • What would you say is the most critical climate issue? Why?
    • What topic related to the climate and our environment are you most passionate about? Why?
    • What do you think are the greatest barriers to protecting our planet? Who do you think is responsible?
    • How could YOU better practice sustainable living in your everyday life?
    • Introduce an example of how climate change can intersect with ALL jobs and ALL lives (impacting our food, water, weather)
    • What can our families do to be more “green”? How can you bring up this conversation at home?
    • Can you explain what regenerative living is? (Or guess if not!) How can you apply regenerative thinking to various aspects of your life and our society?
    • What does intersectional environmentalism mean? How does this affect you?

    Download the complete Educators’ Toolkit

    Download.pdf
  • The Sustainable Classroom

    The Sustainable Classroom

    Download the complete Educators’ Toolkit

    Download.pdf
  • A Sustainable Holiday Season

    A Sustainable Holiday Season

    We believe small actions can make a big difference.
    Here are some ways to think more “green” this holiday season without compromising your families’ traditions.
    • Bring the family to a local farmers market and experiment with new, fresh ingredients. This holiday season, try using the USDA directory or this Local Food Source map to find the markets closest to you.
    • Avoid using plastic plates and cups at gatherings, or bring a marker to designate (even design) one as yours for the night!
    • Want to adventure out a little further? Visit a farm! Check out Farm to Crag’s map or look for urban farms and gardens near you.
    • Compost your turkey scraps // Thanksgiving leftovers
    • Carpool with family (for any COVID-safe gatherings)
    • Be mindful of only buying the amount of food you’ll know you need!
    • Have extra non-perishables that you didn’t use? Donate them to a local food bank or church in your community
    • Recycle your newspaper as wrapping paper
    • Choose “green” shipping when purchasing gifts and/or pay a little extra to cover carbon offsets
    • Order your items in bulk to avoid shipping individual items or find where you can shop in person.
    • Got holiday shopping to do? Reusable water bottles make a great gift for friends & family

    Looking for sustainable alternatives to everyday essentials?

    Try looking through Package Free’s shop here.

    Download and share these ideas on how to have a #GreenHolidaySeason

    Download.pdf
  • Veg-Friendly Recipes

    Veg-Friendly Recipes

    “No matter where you are in North America, you are on indigenous land. And so on this holiday, and any day really, I urge people to explore a deeper connection to what are called ‘American’ foods by understanding true Native-American histories, and begin using what grows naturally around us, and to support Native-American growers. There is no need to make Thanksgiving about a false past. It is so much better when it celebrates the beauty of the present.”

    – Sean Sherman, author of The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen

    Please adapt these recipes to you and your loved ones’ preferences.

    April 6, 2021

    Sesame Cauliflower Rice

    April 6, 2021

    Chickpea Salad

    February 3, 2021

    Quorn Fillet With Grilled Vegetables

    November 6, 2020

    Pumpkin Pancakes

    November 6, 2020

    Vegan Cheesecake

    November 6, 2020

    Vegan Pumpkin Pie

    November 6, 2020

    Garden Herb Biscuits

    November 6, 2020

    Vegan Stuffing

    November 6, 2020

    Easy Vegan Green Bean Casserole

    November 5, 2020

    Quinoa & Apple Stuffing

  • A Green Household

    A Green Household

    We believe sustainability is ultimately a practice, not a purchase, but here are several “green” alternatives to everyday essentials.

    • Replace your dryer sheets with wool dryer balls.
    • Start an herb or vegetable garden.
    • Change your cleaning products to non-toxic cleaners (Blueland)
    • Replace your makeup wipes with a Makeup Eraser
    • Shop sustainably – wear recycled fabrics, participate in clothing swaps (when safe to do so),  visit local thrift stores, or buy/rent items from others! (Poshmark, Depop, Rent the Runway)
    • Visit a local Farmer’s Market for your produce
    • Have lots of things to dispose of or recycle, but not sure how? Check out Terracycle
    • Use Bee’s Wrap food covers instead of Plastic Wrap (Bee’s Wrap)
    • Bring your collapsible metal straws and reusable utensils with you! (Final Straw, ChicagoBag To-Go Ware)
    • Toss out your Ziploc bags for washable, reusable plastic bags (Stasher)
    • Try composting – You can do this in your freezer! (Learn more)
    • Skip those little plastic bags at the grocery store & use mesh produce bags instead (Colony Co)
    • Try using Swedish dish cloths – they take the place of 16 paper towels!
    • Shop “misfit” produce that didn’t fit conventional grocery standards (Misfit Market, Imperfect Foods)

     Looking for sustainable alternatives to everyday essentials? 

    Try looking through Package Free’s shop here

    Download and share these ideas on how to make your home more green

    Download.pdf
  • Shop Sustainably